Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for October, 2011

A quick question – we are a non-profit organizing an annual awards luncheon. Traditionally we recognize elected officials in the audience (this year our Congressman and several city council members and county commissioners) from the podium. This year a State Representative will also offer keynote remarks. The question is – would protocol dictate the other elected officials are recognized before the State Rep is introduced and speaks, or vice versa, or does the order matter as long as all are recognized?  Thank you!
— Brian Hancock

Dear Mr. Hancock:
       If you are asking when to recognize members of the audience, ….. it should be done by a master of ceremonies before the keynote speaker is introduced and invited to the podium.
And the keynote speaker (an anyone else who gets the mike) should be instructed not to re-acknowledge the distinguished guests again. It distracts from their message, is not necessary, and irritates everyone in the audience!
The top guest is acknowledged first, then go down the list in precedence order.
If you can get hold of a copy of my book I provide the correct phrasing to use for introducing by name every type of official you mention. Just look up the “office” in the index and I include the form right after how to write their place cards.
– Robert Hickey www.formsofaddress.info

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

I have a question about using “the Honorable”… I just saw a news item in our legislative service this AM and noticed that a former Oklahoma official (now deceased) will have her name on a highway sign as shown below:
Shelton’s authored legislative language that renames a section of Interstate 35 in Atkins’ honor. Under the new law, the portion of Interstate 35 in Oklahoma City running north from Northeast 23rd Street to the junction of Interstate 35 and Interstate 44 will now be designated as the “Honorable Hannah Diggs Atkins, Secretary of State, Memorial Highway.”
I think it should say The Honorable Hannah Diggs Atkins, Secretary of State of Oklahoma, Memorial Highway.
What do you advise?  I have placed a call to the legislator’s office.
— Chris in Oklahoma

Dear CIO:
       You are right … it is always The Honorable.
However …”The Honorable” is used in address to living people …. not with the name of a deceased person. Hence you don’t see:
       The Honorable George Washington Bridge
       The Honorable Abraham Lincoln Memorial
It is simply:
        The George Washington Bridge
        The Abraham Lincoln Memorial

So call them up and make sure they know it should be:
       The Hanna Diggs Atkins Memorial Highway
             – Robert Hickey www.formsofaddress.info

Read Full Post »

How would Catholic priests address each other in correspondence? Especially if they were in seminary together. Would they be casual as two non-religious friends calling each other by their first names? Might they call each other ‘brother’? I am writing a story and wish to be accurate in the manner in which priests would write letters to each other in the early 1980’s. They are friends from seminary school who have become priests with placements in different parts of the world.
— Carole Schaeffer

Dear Ms. Schaeffer:
       If they were on a first name basis … they would address one another by first names … Bob and Bill
      It’s not any different than two doctors who knew one another in medical school.
      However, if they were later on different hierarchical levels …. then that might change things.
      E.g., if Bob had become the Pope, them Bill would probably address him asYour Holiness unless Bob said …. “Oh Bill, call me Bob like you always have.”

– Robert Hickey www.formsofaddress.info

Read Full Post »

A couple of years ago I completed a lateral thinking course throughtheschoolofthinking.org. I found it very thought provoking and useful. Recently that site has advertised a Masters and a Doctorate in Lateral Thinking. It’s an on-line free training. It’s a lot of work, probably similar to the amount required in a university-level Masters.
They state that graduates would be able to use the post nominals MLT or DLT, forMaster of Lateral Thinking and Doctor of Lateral Thinking. Bear in mind that this is not an accredited college or a university. I realize that there is no post-nominal policehunting people down, but what is the accepted practice for Masters and Doctorates? Does an organization like that have the ‘right’ to offer such post nominals, given they are usually bestowed upon graduates of universities?
— Ross Robinson

Dear Mr. Robinson:
       1. Can you use it? People can present their name however they wish to present their name. So, yes, you could use MLT or DLT.
      2. When can you use it? Degrees are typically credentials pertinent to providing a service.  Post nominals are only included on the official/professional form of your name — not the social form. So if you are including them on your resume the question is for what job, for what service, are these degrees pertinent? What field recognizes these degrees to be of value?
       3. Where can you use it? Degrees have the most value where they are issued — or in places which recognize the certification.  E.g., medical degrees granted by many international schools of medicine are not necessarily recognized in the USA. Some are, some are not. Accredited institutions of higher learning pretty much accept one another’s credits, but for anyone who has tried to have credits transferred knows it is not automatic.
So, an on-line, free degree may be principally of value for personal growth and of the most pertinence in cyberspace.
          – Robert Hickey www.formsofaddress.info

Read Full Post »

Would you recommend using on their place card General John Doe instead ofLTG John Doe?
Would you also recommend using the Governor Doe, or GOV Doe instead ofGovernor John Doe?
— Marietta Stone, again

Dear Ms. Stone:
      I have all this spelled out in my book if this sort of thing comes up often.
      Regarding the Army officer — The full rank is used the given+surname:
             Lieutenant General John Doe
                or
             LTG John Doe
      With his full name he gets his full rank.
      On a formal place card, as in conversation or in a salutation, use the basic rank with his surname:
             General Doe
      Regarding the Governor, his formal name is:
             The Honorable John Doe
      On a formal place card as in conversation or in a salutation he is:
             Governor Doe
      Note that the form:
             Governor John Doe
      … is something you hear in the media, but is not a formal form of address. It’s just a reporter referring to him in the third person.
Regarding your suggestion of GOV Doe — I think maybe your are putting GOV in all caps to match LTG? The letters in LTG are capped because it is a Army-specific abbreviation. LTG means he is a US Army Lieutenant General.  If he were a Marine Lieutenant General the Marine-specific abbreviation is LtGen. As I said I have all this spelled out in my book

– Robert Hickey www.formsofaddress.info

 

Read Full Post »

Could you please provide me with the proper way to address a Freeholder?
— Cynthia Davis

Dear Ms. Davis:
The short answer is to address freeholders on a letter or envelope, or list their name on a program as:
The Honorable (Full Name)
 And in conversation or in a salutation use:
  Mr./Ms./Mrs./Miss/etc. (Surname)
The etc. means to use whatever honorific they normally use. There is no special honorific for freeholders.
For those who don’t know what a freeholder is …. elected county officials in New Jersey are called “freeholders.”
The term is rooted in the colonial period when only men with land, then called a freehold, were permitted to vote or serve in elected office.  In most other states holders of the equivalent office are known as county commissioners or county council members.
In most counties freeholders are elected at-large, or countywide.  In several counties, however, some or all freeholders are elected by district.  In Atlantic County and Essex Counties, the some freeholders are elected at-large and others are elected by district.  In Hudson County, all freeholders are elected by district.  Whether to elect freeholders by district or at large is determined by county referenda.
– Robert Hickey www.formsofaddress.info

Read Full Post »

It was decided we would use the informal form of address on the place cards, i.e.John Doe instead of Mr. John Doe or Mr. Doe. Should that go on one side or both sides?
— Marietta Stone

Dear Ms. Stone:
      Protocol officers typically use the word place card for the small card (maybe flat, maybe folded) … perhaps 1″ x 3″ … with just the name facing the individual. That’s just to tell the person which seat is theirs.
And use the word tent card or table tent for a larger folded card with the names on both sides to facilitate networking.  It needs to be larger so what’s on it can be read from across the table.
Anyway, that’s the way we keep them defined. Both are used all the time … which style is used is determined by the requirements of the event.
On a place card the name is written with the name facing the person … the ‘conversational form” is used …. Mr. Doe. 
The only time you would use Mr. John Doe on a place card is when you have aMr. John Doe and a Mr. William Doe BOTH coming and you need to be specific.
On a tent card how the name is written: call-by name; full name; name & title; name, title & organization; — all depends on what’s the right for the event
– Robert Hickey www.formsofaddress.info

Read Full Post »