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Archive for the ‘Place Cards’ Category

Can you tell me how to address a Lieutenant Governor in a program and on a place card?
In the program would it be:
Lieutenant Governor Mark A. Darr
or 
Mark A. Darr
 Lieutenant Governor of Arkansas
On the place card, do I refer to him as:
  The Honorable Mark A. Darr
or
  Lieutenant Governor Mark A. Darr
— Nicole in Little Rock

Dear Nicole:
       I provide all the forms (invitations, letters, introductions, saluations, conversation)for a Lieutenant Governor on page 191 of my book if this sort of thing comes up often.
You don’t need to include Arkansas if you are not having lieutenant governorsfrom other states and the event is in Arkansas.
  PROGRAM
   The Honorable Mark A. Darr
Lieutenant Governor
If you do want to include “Arkansas” using “State of Arkansas” is more formal.
 The Honorable Mark A. Darr
Lieutenant Governor of the State of Arkansas
     PLACE CARDS
If it is a small place card only to identify for the Lieutenant Governor which is his seat  … (and is not a larger double-sided tent card) … it has just his name on it as he’d be addressed in conversation.
      Mr. Darr
On the other hand, formal place cards are sometimes done with just a title.  E.g.,at The White House the President’s place card reads The President.
 The Lieutenant Governor
Larger, double-sided tent cards (text on both sides, meant for others at the table to see who is who) can have much more information:
   Mark A. Darr
Lieutenant Governor
       – Robert Hickey www.formsofaddress.info

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Would you recommend using on their place card General John Doe instead ofLTG John Doe?
Would you also recommend using the Governor Doe, or GOV Doe instead ofGovernor John Doe?
— Marietta Stone, again

Dear Ms. Stone:
      I have all this spelled out in my book if this sort of thing comes up often.
      Regarding the Army officer — The full rank is used the given+surname:
             Lieutenant General John Doe
                or
             LTG John Doe
      With his full name he gets his full rank.
      On a formal place card, as in conversation or in a salutation, use the basic rank with his surname:
             General Doe
      Regarding the Governor, his formal name is:
             The Honorable John Doe
      On a formal place card as in conversation or in a salutation he is:
             Governor Doe
      Note that the form:
             Governor John Doe
      … is something you hear in the media, but is not a formal form of address. It’s just a reporter referring to him in the third person.
Regarding your suggestion of GOV Doe — I think maybe your are putting GOV in all caps to match LTG? The letters in LTG are capped because it is a Army-specific abbreviation. LTG means he is a US Army Lieutenant General.  If he were a Marine Lieutenant General the Marine-specific abbreviation is LtGen. As I said I have all this spelled out in my book

– Robert Hickey www.formsofaddress.info

 

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It was decided we would use the informal form of address on the place cards, i.e.John Doe instead of Mr. John Doe or Mr. Doe. Should that go on one side or both sides?
— Marietta Stone

Dear Ms. Stone:
      Protocol officers typically use the word place card for the small card (maybe flat, maybe folded) … perhaps 1″ x 3″ … with just the name facing the individual. That’s just to tell the person which seat is theirs.
And use the word tent card or table tent for a larger folded card with the names on both sides to facilitate networking.  It needs to be larger so what’s on it can be read from across the table.
Anyway, that’s the way we keep them defined. Both are used all the time … which style is used is determined by the requirements of the event.
On a place card the name is written with the name facing the person … the ‘conversational form” is used …. Mr. Doe. 
The only time you would use Mr. John Doe on a place card is when you have aMr. John Doe and a Mr. William Doe BOTH coming and you need to be specific.
On a tent card how the name is written: call-by name; full name; name & title; name, title & organization; — all depends on what’s the right for the event
– Robert Hickey www.formsofaddress.info

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We are preparing place markers for a panel discussion.  Among the panel are three attorneys (one of whom is also a state representative) and the Chief Justice of the Wyoming Supreme Court.
The only two “civilians” are members of the press.
Would we simply list their names on the first line, followed by the title on the second line??
— Anne Leslie.

Dear Ms. Leslie:
I am assuming by place markers — you mean tent cards with their names on them so the audience can tell who is who?
If so, give the elected official and Chief Justice their formal forms:
The Honorable (Full Name of State Representative)
(Office)
Chief Justice (Full name)
The Supreme Court of Wyoming
      Give the attorney the post-nominal used to identify practicing attorneys:
(Full Name), Esq.
(Office)
And since the others are getting a courtesy title, honorific, or post nominal … give the reporters an honorific too:
  Mr. James Wilson
(Name of newspaper)

– Robert Hickey www.formsofaddress.info

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